Thursday, September 27, 2007

How To Become Dis-illusioned

Only just stumbled across this guy, but already it's clear why Ian Saville is better than any "bourgeois magician". Click his name to play the clip because embedding YouTube seems to fuck up my template.

Monday, September 24, 2007

Free Screen: Osama and Walkout

A small group of us gathered tonight to launch Next To Nowhere's Free Screen evenings, where two full length films of interest to radical types will shown for free (or donation) every fortnight.

The first film was Osama - an unflinching account of life under the Taliban, which was all the more devastating by the almost total lack of resistance to their reign of terror, and the realisation that despite all the American promises, the situation hasn't exactly improved.

Then it was onto Walkout, which told the much more uplifting tale of a Chicano student rebellion against racist school authorities in the late sixties.

It's been an amazing week at Liverpool's new social centre, which has the makings of being a great activist space. A virtual round of applause to everyone involved!

Sunday, September 23, 2007

Why Culture Of Capital Sucks For Working Class Scousers

Here, plain and simple, are the reasons why working class people in Liverpool are waking up to the fact that Capital of Culture is just another con. As new anarchism site The Nihilist so succinctly puts it:
The capital of culture is not an award of culture at all rather an invitation for big businesses to come into the city like vultures and pick on the poor working class consumerist habits. Yes they will provide more jobs and increase the economic state but how much will that benefit the city itself? The ones who will benefit are the owners of these multinational companies who don’t even live in the city. It is just another move to make every city in the country have exactly the same shops where everyone can buy the same clothes.

Saturday, September 22, 2007

The Boy Who Dropped An Egg On The World

Written and Directed by Julian Bond
Jack's Hard Rub Theatre
Next To Nowhere, Bold Street (21st September 2007)


It was standing room only at
Next To Nowhere, as Liverpool's new social centre played host to its first play, from local theatre company Jack's Hard Rub.

The space seems quite well suited to small scale, intimate productions. Though there are some visibility problems which need to be looked into, the acoustics were excellent, and the audience couldn't help but be drawn in by the cast's magnetic performance.

The scene was set in a dusty Iraqi cafe, during the initial stages of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, and gradually the characters were introduced by Shakir the cafe owner who finds himself constantly sweeping the dust of the universe. There was Asaph (Nick Osbourne), an eight year old boy troubled by apocalyptic visions; the two cafe-bound intellectuals Iyad (David Collins) and Narzim (Mike Saunders), a posh British soldier (Zoran Blackie), and
Mariyam (Angela Millett), a bereaved mother who has been turned 'mad' by her grief.

There is so much more to this play than can be expressed in one review; it seems suited to an essay. However, I think many of these levels may be apparent only to the writer. Bond has deliberately kept many of the motifs ambiguous - especially the significance of the egg-dropping - but some people afterwards interpreted this as a lack of depth. That's a great shame for a play which screams 'microcosm', and wants to be an allegory for vast swathes of human life.

Despite this reservation, a lot of the writing is very skillfully done. The script is by turns poetically beautiful and grittily brutal, despairing and humorous, brimming with hate and overflowing with love. The audience is constantly surprised, which is a great thing for a play that doesn't move in space to achieve.

All the cast displayed enough talent to fill Next To Nowhere ten times over! Saunders was excellent in his role as a heartbroken and on the edge Palestinian, Osbourne was a completely believable young boy, Blackie convinced in both the Jekyll and the Hyde parts of his character, and the spectral Millett sent shivers down spines and tears into eyes with her portrayal. In fact, 'portrayal' isn't anything like the right word; it was impossible to say where the actress ended and the character began.

Everything considered, the venue could hardly have had a better theatrical curtain-raiser, and hopefully it was a taste of things to come.

Friday, September 21, 2007

Introduction to Anarchism in Liverpool

Yet another fantastic night at Next To Nowhere on Thursday, as twenty-five people attended an 'Introduction to Anarchism' discussion.

The meeting started with a twenty minute talk from a member of the Anarchist Federation, which established some of the crucial differences between the way anarchists organise and the tactics of other 'revolutionary' groups. Anarchists fundamentally believe in self-organisation, as opposed to appealing to politicians and professional mediators. This often leads to confrontation with the state, and even violence. Though this is not an aim in itself, we acknowledge that the ruling class will not willingly give up power, so it is an unfortunate necessity. The comrade illustrated his points with reference to the anti Poll Tax movement in the UK, plus the Shell to Sea camp and the anti bin tax movement in Ireland. He insisted that class struggle must be at the heart of anarchism, so he "gets excited" when he sees "people in flat caps"!

We then all sat in a circle and began an open discussion. There were many people in the meeting who had never really encountered anarchism before, so I suggested we talked about what an anarchist society would be like. This became quite a long utopian imagining session, which can be fun to do once in a while. The mood in the room noticeably lifted, as people began to let their imagination wander, something we are taught not to do from an early age. We also touched upon why anarchists focus so much on 'the state' as being the enemy (compared to other groups), instead of capitalism. Many of the participants agreed that capitalism and the state are essentially inseparable, and that the state helps organise, defend and extend capitalism, against the interests of working class people.

At the end of the meeting, we decided to set up a series of six (non-hierarchical!) 'anarchist schools', each exploring a different aspect of anarchism as it relates to everyday life and struggle. These will start in a few weeks time (when there's space in the social centre calendar), and will be fortnightly.

Still to come this week:
Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm
The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play
Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's powerful anti-war production.

Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm til late
School Students Against War - Benefit Night
Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students Against War.

Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm
Free Screen - Film Night
The first of our regular film nights.
Showing Osama - an Afghan film about life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti-racist school struggles in 60s LA

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Another Construction Collapse in Capital of Culture City

As the city of Liverpool is frantically prepared for the Capital of Culture celebrations, workplace safety is bound to come a poor second to profit margins. This year has already seen a three fatalities on Merseyside construction sites, and though no-one has been killed in this latest incident, it looks very likely there will be more deaths before 1st January.

The builders were working on Liverpool John Moores University’s new £23.5m art and design academy when the scaffolding collapsed and they fell 30ft.

Five ambulances and two fire vehicles attended the scene at the junction of Duckinfield Street and Brownlow Hill, near the Metropolitan Cathedral, and six men were taken to hospital. One is said to have serious back injuries.

In January a Polish man was killed when a crane crashed 120ft into a city centre building site between Seel Street and Colquitt Street. Two months later father-of-two Keith Wharton was killed by a frame which fell from a crane at the Stackright Building Systems site on the Knowsley industrial estate. On March 29 a man was killed when a crane toppled over at Wavertree Boulevard.

Click here to read my recent interview with local builder Terry Egan.

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Liverpool IMC Info Night

Another night at Next To Nowhere, and another triumph! There's a great buzz about the place, and everything's really exciting! Who knew activism was meant to be like this?

The opening presentation came from...well...me, and I gave a brief outline of what Indymedia is all about, where it's come from and hopefully where it's going.

The Liverpool IMC team then threw the meeting open to the twenty or so people who'd come along, so they could ask questions, get some advice, or even try putting their own stuff up. Very well done Margaret McAdam for becoming a journalist, and exposing the horrific treatment a woman called Beatrice Ketcha Guessie is getting at the hands of the UK government.

We always need more stories for Indymedia, and you've often got news that isn't represented in the corporate media. So click here and let's get going. Don't hate the media, be the media!

Still to come this week:
Thursday 20th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Introduction to Anarchism
Merseyside Anarchist Group presents speakers and discussion on the politics and history of anarchism. With speakers from the Anarchist Federation.

Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm
The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play
Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's powerful anti-war production.

Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm til late
School Students Against War - Benefit Night
Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students Against War.

Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm
Free Screen - Film Night
The first of our regular film nights.
Showing Osama - an Afghan film about life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti-racist school struggles in 60s LA

In The Year 2035...

Another intriguing post over at Southpawpunch this week (though to tell the truth his every post is well worth reading). It's the somewhat melancholy musings of a retiring leftist blogger, some twenty-eight years into the future. Suffice to say it doesn't make for happy reading, but it's definitely thought-provoking.

Ok, and this is a blatant attempt to get him to put my 'review' on the side of his blog, so this is the bit to quote, yeah?
Southpawpunch is the 'revolutionary' blogger I actually expect to meet at the barricades.
There you are.

Liverpool Conspiracy Evening

The third event in this opening week of Next To Nowhere was another great success (honestly, I would say if it wasn't; telling the truth is always a revolutionary act!). About twenty people discussed conspiracy theories - or 'alternative proposals' as I think we decided to call them - in a calm and respectful way. This was the first time I've ever seen that happen! It is possible!

We began with a wonderfully meandering and often bizarre introduction from the facilitator, which set exactly the right tone for the talk we were about to have! We then each said how much we believed in conspiracy theories out of ten, with one being "you're all mad", and ten "woo...er...there's a robot in my pocket". I don't remember anyone saying less than three, although a couple refused to give any number, rejecting the entire premise of the question.

It soon became clear that people were most interested in the 'alternative proposals' surrounding the events of September 11th, 2001. This seemed to be because a) the people behind the Bush administration appear to have advanced their agendas using constant references to that day, and b) that many elements of the 'official conspiracy theory' don't stack up.

The conversation eventually turned to what use (if any) activist groups should make of alternative proposals. Opinion was divided on this. A few felt that they should be central to somehow 'awakening' people to a world that has been pulled over their eyes. But the majority expressed different shades of the opinion that such arguments can turn people off radical politics, marginalising us, and that political change only happens when people become conscious of their own interests. I made the point that I believed the Bush government was likely to bear some responsiblity for 9/11, but I had come to these conclusions long after becoming anti-war, anti-police state, and indeed anti-capitalist. It was therefore difficult to see how alternative proposal people could avoid preaching to the converted. However, the idea was floated that we should have individual nights where people describe their own pet consp...alternative thingies, and no-one seemed to disagree this would be a fun thing to do.

Still to come this week:
Wednesday 19th September - 7.30pm - 9pm
Indymedia Info Night
The Liverpool Indymedia team present films and discussion introducing Indymedia and letting you know how to get the best out of the site.

Thursday 20th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Introduction to Anarchism
Merseyside Anarchist Group presents speakers and discussion on the politics and history of anarchism. With speakers from the Anarchist Federation.

Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm
The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play
Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's powerful anti-war production.

Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm til late
School Students Against War - Benefit Night
Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students Against War.

Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm
Free Screen - Film Night
The first of our regular film nights.
Showing Osama - an Afghan film about life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti-racist school struggles in 60s LA

Monday, September 17, 2007

Oaxaca Info Night Held In Liverpool

An audience of about thirty-five people came to Next To Nowhere last night, to meet an Indymedia activist from Oaxaca, Mexico, and to hear him speak about recent struggles against the state government there.

The activist showed three videos during his presentation. The first introduced us to Puebla-Panama Plan, an attempt to carve-up central America along neoliberal lines. Though the politics was quite complicated, the video made great use of puppetry, and we all understood in the end: farmers and the poor are going to get fucked over unless they resist.

The second video showed scenes from May last year, where the Mexican state brutally attacked protesters who were blockading roads in San Salvador Atenco. Some of the scenes made me want to jump through the screen and help the demonstrators, which I suppose is a good review of a film like that. Especially revealing was how the equivalent of Sky News cast aside any claim to 'neutrality', and urged the authorities on to ever more brutal repression.

Finally, we saw some more scenes from last year, filmed in the speaker's own community in Oaxaca. Striking teachers were attacked by police, and eighteen people were killed over the next few days, including an Indymedia journalist from the US. In response, unions, non-governmental organizations, social organizations, cooperatives, and parents convened to form The Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (or APPO), which aims to take over the running of the area. You can buy the DVD from Next To Nowhere.

It was heavy stuff, and many of us were still exhausted from Saturday night, but it was wonderful to see our new centre getting put to excellent use. Of course, the issue is what can we actually do to confront neoliberal attacks in our city, the country and the world? What alternatives can we build? How can we defend them from the inevitable state attacks? These questions remain to be answered.

Read the report of Nottingham's Oaxaca infonight here, complete with audio.

Still to come this week:
Tuesday 18th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Conspiracy Evening
From 9-11 and JFK to the Masons and the New World Order - why are there so many conspiracy theories and what should we do with them?

Wednesday 19th September - 7.30pm - 9pm
Indymedia Info Night
The Liverpool Indymedia team present films and discussion introducing Indymedia and letting you know how to get the best out of the site.

Thursday 20th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Introduction to Anarchism
Merseyside Anarchist Group presents speakers and discussion on the politics and history of anarchism. With speakers from the Anarchist Federation.

Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm
The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play
Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's powerful anti-war production.

Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm til late
School Students Against War - Benefit Night
Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students Against War.

Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm
Free Screen - Film Night
The first of our regular film nights.
Showing Osama - an Afghan film about life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti-racist school struggles in 60s LA

Sunday, September 16, 2007

There's Next To Nowhere You Can Get Parties Like This...

Next To Nowhere - Liverpool's new social centre - opened last night with the political party to end political parties. Over one hundred people danced and chatted long, long, long into the night, raising money for our exciting radical space while they were at it.

Still to come this week:
Sunday 16th September - 7pm - 10pm
Oaxaca Info Night
Mexican speaker from Indymedia Oaxaca. Update on the uprising, police repression & protests in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Tuesday 18th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Conspiracy Evening
From 9-11 and JFK to the Masons and the New World Order - why are there so many conspiracy theories and what should we do with them?

Wednesday 19th September - 7.30pm - 9pm
Indymedia Info Night
The Liverpool Indymedia team present films and discussion introducing Indymedia and letting you know how to get the best out of the site.

Thursday 20th September - 7.30pm - 10pm
Introduction to Anarchism
Merseyside Anarchist Group presents speakers and discussion on the politics and history of anarchism. With speakers from the Anarchist Federation.

Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm
The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play
Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's powerful anti-war production.

Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm til late
School Students Against War - Benefit Night
Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students Against War.

Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm
Free Screen - Film Night
The first of our regular film nights.
Showing Osama - an Afghan film about life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti-racist school struggles in 60s LA

Friday, September 14, 2007

It's A Free World (15)

Directed by Ken Loach, Written by Paul Laverty
Screening on Channel 4 at 9pm on 24th September 2007

Throughout a career that has spanned almost half a century, Ken Loach has won a small but dedicated band of enthusiasts, who relish his pull-no-punches realism and dedication to telling the stories of people who are misleadingly labelled 'ordinary'. Though his latest film has so far only got a one day release at certain Picturehouse venues, but it is well worth tuning into Channel 4 on Monday 24th September to see it. Because he and writing partner Paul Laverty have only gone and done it again.

When we meet Angie (
Kierston Wareing), she is just about to get sacked from her job in a Polish recruitment agency for throwing a glass of water in the face of a sleazy boss. Sick of being treated like shit as a temp worker, and concerned for the future of her son (Joe Siffleet), she decides to set up her own business finding work for migrant labourers from the back of a London pub. With her flatmate (Juliet Ellis) by her side, Angie sets off on a corporate learning curve far steeper than the one taken by well-heeled contestants on The Apprentice. So just how far will the pair go to make some money and gain some self-respect? As it turns out, a long, long way...

Loach and Laverty's great strength as filmmakers is undoubtedly character development. In each of their films, the protagonists end up being very different people from how they begin, and yet this is almost always done seamlessly and believably. The reason for this is that whenever someone has to make a choice in one of their films, they inevitably follow what seems to be in their material interests. Their perspective isn't a cynical one; they just call it as they see it. Where most these days strive for the literally 'sensational' and 'unbelievable', Loach and Laverty pride themselves in achieving just the opposite.

The title is of course an ironic one. Politicians tell us we are 'free' every day, even waging wars in the name of 'liberty', but the only true freedom in our society seems to be that of money to move around the world, reducing every human relationship to cold cash calculation. As Loach has pointed out in interviews for the film, the 'flexible' labour market just means workers globally must bend over backwards to satisfy the needs of profit-hungry corporations. Business has its cake and eats it, because in the absence of any alternative, the right finds it easy to divide and therefore conquer workers. This isn't one of their inspiring pictures by any means (unlike say Bread and Roses or Land and Freedom), but Loach and Laverty have no duty to put a smile on our faces. In their eyes, diagnosis of the disease is the first step towards curing it.

Sunday, September 09, 2007

Hallam Foe (18)

Directed by David Mackenzie, Written by Peter Jinks (novel), Ed Whitmore and David Mackenzie (screenplay)

Should adaptations stay loyal to the book, or must the director’s first priority be making sure the film flows properly? It’s a question that’s taxed the brains of many handwringing reviewers with nothing significant to worry about. But why bring ‘morality’ into it? A film is either successful or it isn’t, and the director, writer and viewer will all have a different idea of what success means. Personally, I think this film isn’t particularly successful, because the most intriguing traits of the title role are barely hinted at, in what - at only ninety-four minutes - is quite a short movie.

Hallam Foe (Jamie Bell) is a seventeen-year-old who is struggling to come to terms with both the death of his mother three years ago and adolescence. Now his rich architect dad (Ciarán Hinds) has got re-married, Hallam plays out a fantasy life hiding in a treehouse and spying on his step mum (Claire Forlani) plus some other villagers from the rooftops of their Scottish country pile. Eventually the interesting but poorly developed lead character runs away for the bright lights of Edinburgh, and gets a job at a hotel because the head of human resources (Sophia Myles) looks like his mother. Soon he’s spying on her too, and so the film drones on towards it pseudo-Freudian conclusion.

There are some saving graces. Giles Nuttgens’ cinematography is certainly evocative, while Bell and Myles have excellent chemistry together. But in many ways Hallam Foe feels a lot like Asylum, Mackenzie’s last film, which had ambitions to be dark, disturbing, and deep, but never got further than the most shallow and superficial psychology.

Still, it might be a decent book.

Sunday, September 02, 2007

Workers Vs Workers Beer Company

Servers who work at events with the Workers Beer Company have set up a union, in an attempt to protect ourselves from the creeping further influence of profit margins on our conditions.

For those who don't know, the Workers Beer Company was set up by Battersea and Wandsworth TUC in the mid-1980s, as a fundraising arm for campaigning activities. Since then, the company has grown to a large size, and provides workers for Glastonbury, Leeds and Reading (Carling Weekend), Tolpuddle, and various other festivals.

On the surface, it seems like servers have a decent deal. You get free entry, some free food and drink, and free camping space. The organisation you come with (I go with Merseyside Hazards & Environmental Centre, but unions, campaign groups and others are represented) gets £6.50 per hour for your labour, which is better than many bar workers are paid. But there are drawbacks. For a start, the average festival server is worked far harder than they would be in a pub, and we are entitled to only twenty minutes breaktime in a six hour shift. Or at least we thought that was an entitlement...

The essential contradiction behind the WBC is that it's based entirely on the exploitation of workers! The more servers are exploited, the more money is raised for campaigning against the exploitation of workers! Add a layer of paid bureaucrats to this mix and you get a structure resembling the 'dictatorship of the proletariat' in the Soviet Union! But hey, you get to see some bands, so it's just about worth it.

This year, however, it seems the screw has been tightened significantly.

On Thursday, 23rd August I arrived at Leeds festival to set up for the weekend, and already there were grumblings among servers who'd been at Glastonbury in June. I discussed the issues with a fellow server from Liverpool, who complained that there had been a serious health and safety lapse, and that following an incident where one group had openly touted for tips, we would ALL now have to hand our tips over to the WBC's Clause IV fund. I was disgusted to discover that the money was earmarked for the building of a school in Gambia. Now obviously I want children in Africa to be educated same as anyone, but then so does the entire western ruling class. There's nothing radical about that. With a postal strike on, I wondered aloud why the money wasn't being donated to the strikers. Anyway, fuck that, I wanted my money, to do with as I pleased (including paying £4 per stodgy meal in the WBC compound)!

At breakfast time on Friday, I was approached by my colleague from Liverpool, who had a bundle of leaflets explaining the situation to our fellow workers. I distributed a few dozen of them, and was quickly collared by a WBC manager. He asked me lots of questions in an aggressive manner, disputed my right to hand out leaflets containing info about an incident I'd not seen (therefore undermining the whole basis of trade unionism), and warning I was making myself "look like a tit".

I was on late shift, so I and a few others shuttled round all the beer tents, talking to individuals from each one, and asking them to provide a delegate to report on their conditions to a meeting on Saturday morning. As we passed each other in the fields, us troublemakers encouraged each other by shouting things like 'all power in the hands of the workers'. By evening, rumours were circulating that the managers had come to an agreement over tips, so I was able to enjoy Nine Inch Nails and Smashing Pumpkins satisfied that I'd put in a good day's activism.

Saturday morning bright and early saw the first meeting of the servers' union, with about ten people present. We discussed problems that had arisen from Friday's shift, for instance that some managers were refusing their workers the twenty minutes break, which they claimed was not officially part of our contract. Someone noticed that our staff t-shirts (normally provided by the WBC's own 'Ethical Threads'), were now being supplied by notorious union-busters Fruit Of The Loom. What's more, we'd been promised an announcement on tips by 9.30, and that time had been and gone. We decided that we would openly keep the tips, and force the WBC's hand on the issue.

We had our final Leeds meeting on Sunday, the main point of which was to organise for next year's festivals and getting an internet group going. There were about twenty of us this time, the word having got out further over the past twenty-four hours. It had even got out to our colleagues serving at the Reading festival, but because the server activists were in a tiny minority there, they'd reportedly been threatened with the police! Even at Leeds, some managers had STILL been giving servers grief over the tips! Someone pointed out that legally the WBC didn’t have a leg to stand on, because if someone gives an individual money over and above what they are paying, it is up to that individual what they want to do with it. We resolved to spread the word to all server groups who work for the WBC at any festival, so they can all send one delegate to meetings in the future, and therefore we will be setting the agenda rather than responding to the WBC's diktats.

With many of the servers being Thatcher's children, it was a first taste of workplace activism for some of us, so that was really positive. In fact, it was one of the highlights of my festival, but then most of the music wasn't up to much.

Saturday, September 01, 2007

Grand Opening Week At Liverpool's Next To Nowhere

Today I give my blog over to an advance warning from Liverpool's new social centre:

We open with a week of events from 15th September to 23rd September (flyer), and from then on will be available to book for meetings and events. If you have a meeting or event that you would like to put on why not book the centre?

Calendar of Coming Events and Meetings (click header to return to homepage)

Grand Opening Week

(flyer)
Saturday 15th September - 7pm till late

Opening night gig and party


Come celebrate in grand style with a night of live music and great DJs.
Donation on the door with all proceeds going to the running costs of the
centre.


Sunday 16th September - 7pm - 10pm

Oaxaca Info Night


Mexican speaker from Indymedia Oaxaca. Update on the uprising, police
repression & protests in Oaxaca, Mexico. (flyer)


Tuesday 18th September - 7.30pm - 10pm

Conspiracy Evening

From 9-11 and JFK to the Masons and the New World Order - why are there
so many conspiracy theories and what should we do with them?


Wednesday 19th September - 7.30pm - 9pm

Indymedia Info Night


The Liverpool Indymedia team present films and discussion introducing
Indymedia and letting you know how to get the best out of the site.


Thursday 20th September - 7.30pm - 10pm

Introduction to Anarchism


Merseyside Anarchist Group presents speakers and discussion on the politics
and history of anarchism. With speakers from the Anarchist Federation.
(flyer)


Friday 21st September - 7.30pm - 10pm

The Boy Who Dropped an Egg on the World - A Play


Jack's Hard Rub theatre company present writer/director Julian Bond's
powerful anti-war production.


Saturday 22nd September - 7.30pm till late

School Students Against War - Benefit Night


Live music and DJs, good company and dancing to benefit School Students
Against War.


Sunday 23rd September - 7pm - 11pm

Free Screen - Film Night


The first of our regular film nights. Showing Osama - an Afghan film about
life under the Taliban and Walkout - a drama based on anti racist school
struggles in 60s LA.

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